Treatment of ADHD among Children with Special Health Care Needs

ADHD InfographicThe Journal of Pediatrics has published a new NCBDDD study, Treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder among Children with Special Health Care Needs, the first national study to look at behavioral therapy, medication, and dietary supplements to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) among children ages 4-17.

The Journal of Pediatrics has published a new NCBDDD study, Treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder among Children with Special Health Care Needs, the first national study to look at behavioral therapy, medication, and dietary supplements to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) among children ages 4-17.  The results provide a benchmark for the state of medical practice just prior to the release of 2011 clinical guidelines for treatment of ADHD from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).  Current AAP guidelines recommend that for school-aged children (6-18 years of age) with ADHD, treatment include ADHD medication with or without behavioral therapy, with both medication and behavioral therapy as the preferred treatment. Behavioral therapy is recommended first for preschoolers (4-5 years of age) with ADHD.  NCBDDD researchers used data from the 2009-10 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs to describe how ADHD is treated across the United States.  They found that just before the release of the 2011 guidelines, many children with ADHD were not receiving treatment as outlined in the current guidelines.

This is important information for healthcare providers so that they can gain a greater understanding of the patterns of the treatment of ADHD, and what more should be done to improve the quality of care for children with ADHD.  Please read more key findings of the article here.

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